Pemphigus vulgaris

Pemphigus vulgaris

Pemphigus vulgaris is a rare autoimmune disease (up to 3.2 cases per 100,000 population) that causes severe blistering of the skin and of the mucous membranes lining the mouth, nose, throat and genitals. Blisters are sacs with fluid that develop on the upper layer of the skin so their roofs are very thin and fragile, and break easily to leave raw areas (erosions) that can be extensive and painful. Pemphigus does not go away by itself, and always needs treatment by a Dermatologist.  read more

 

 

 

Pemphigus Foliaceous

Pemphigus Foliaceous

Pemphigus foliaceus usually begins with small (approximately 1 cm), pruritic, crusted lesions resembling corn flakes on the upper torso and face. The crusts are easily removed, leaving chronic, superficial erosions.

Over weeks to months, the condition progresses, with an increasing number of lesions appearing on the upper torso, face, and scalp. In extensive cases, lesions develop over the entire body, become confluent, and can progress to an ‘exfoliative erythroderma’  read more

 

 

 

Other Pemphigus types

Pemphigus erythematosus is a variant that just affects the face and overlaps with lupus erythematosus. It is also known as Senear-Usher syndrome.

Fogo selvagem (Portuguese for “wild fire”; also known as endemic pemphigus and Brazilian pemphigus) which may be triggered by exposure to one or more environmental antigens.  read more